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itreintaycinco:

"Do not advice me, I can make my own mistakes". -Maria Felix, actress.
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“Homeland”
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vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
vmagazine:


The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13
“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  
h/t nowness
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arquitecturadelvacio:

Anjelica Huston fotografiada por Ara Gallant, 1976
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arquitecturadelvacio:

Anjelica Huston fotografiada por Ara Gallant, 1976
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Chanel Haute Couture f/w 2012
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La beauté berbere
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Megan Draper
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Night
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uv-ray:

Only lovers left alive
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Only Lovers Left Alive
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Christine Centenera
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blkdnm:

A PORTRAIT OF KENZA FOURATI, PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOHAN IN MONTAUK NEW YORK. 
SWEATER 21.